History Statistics Sensor


The history_stats sensor platform provides quick statistics about another component or platforms, using data from the history.

It can track how long the component has been in a specific state, in a custom time period.

Examples of what you can track:

  • How long you were at home this week
  • How long the lights were ON yesterday
  • How long you watched TV today

Configuration

To enable the history statistics sensor, add the following lines to your configuration.yaml:

# Example configuration.yaml entry
sensor:
  - platform: history_stats
    name: Lamp ON today
    entity_id: light.my_lamp
    state: 'on'
    type: time
    start: '{{ now().replace(hour=0).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) }}'
    end: '{{ now() }}'

Configuration variables:

  • entity_id (Required): The entity you want to track
  • state (Required): The state you want to track
  • name (Optional): Name displayed on the frontend
  • type (Optional): The type of sensor: time, ratio, or count. Defaults to time
  • start: When to start the measure (timestamp or datetime).
  • end: When to stop the measure (timestamp or datetime)
  • duration: Duration of the measure

You have to provide exactly 2 of start, end and duration.
You can use template extensions such as now() or as_timestamp() to handle dynamic dates, as shown in the examples below.

Sensor type

Depending on the sensor type you choose, the history_stats component can show different values:

  • time: The default value, which is the tracked time, in hours
  • ratio: The tracked time divided by the length of your period, as a percentage
  • count: How many times the component you track was changed to the state you track

Time periods

The history_stats component will execute a measure within a precise time period. You should always provide 2 of the following :

  • When the period starts (start variable)
  • When the period ends (end variable)
  • How long is the period (duration variable)

As start and end variables can be either datetimes or timestamps, you can configure almost any period you want.

Duration

The duration variable is used when the time period is fixed. Different syntaxes for the duration are supported, as shown below.

# 6 hours
duration: 06:00
# 1 minute, 30 seconds
duration: 00:01:30
# 2 hours and 30 minutes
duration:
  # supports seconds, minutes, hours, days
  hours: 2
  minutes: 30

Examples

Here are some examples of periods you could work with, and what to write in your configuration.yaml:

Today: starts at 00:00 of the current day and ends right now.

    start: '{{ now().replace(hour=0).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) }}'
    end: '{{ now() }}'

Yesterday: ends today at 00:00, lasts 24 hours.

    end: '{{ now().replace(hour=0).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) }}'
    duration:
      hours: 24

This morning (6AM - 11AM): starts today at 6, lasts 5 hours.

    start: '{{ now().replace(hour=6).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) }}'
    duration:
      hours: 5

Current week: starts last Monday at 00:00, ends right now.

Here, last Monday is today as a timestamp, minus 86400 times the current weekday (86400 is the number of seconds in one day, the weekday is 0 on Monday, 6 on Sunday).

    start: '{{ as_timestamp( now().replace(hour=0).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) ) - now().weekday() * 86400 }}'
    end: '{{ now() }}'

Last 30 days: ends today at 00:00, lasts 30 days. Easy one.

    end: '{{ now().replace(hour=0).replace(minute=0).replace(second=0) }}'
    duration:
      days: 30

All your history starts at timestamp = 0, and ends right now.

    start: '{{ 0 }}'
    end: '{{ now() }}'

If you want to check if your period is right, just click on your component, the from and to attributes will show the start and end of the period, nicely formatted.