Installation


Installation can be performed using Docker (Contributed by marijngiesen) or manually if Docker doesn’t work for you. We also have a Raspberry PI version of Docker contributed by snizzleorg

Using Docker (Non Raspian)

Assuming you already have Docker installed, installation is fairly easy.

Clone the Repository

Clone the hadashboard repository to the current local directory on your machine.

$ git clone https://github.com/home-assistant/hadashboard.git

Change your working directory to the repository root. Moving forward, we will be working from this directory.

$ cd hadashboard

Build the docker image

$ docker build -t hadashboard .

When the build completes, you can run the dashboard with:

$ docker run --name="hadashboard" -d -v <path_to_hadashboard>/dashboards:/app/dashboards -v <path_to_hadashboard>/lib/ha_conf.rb:/app/lib/ha_conf.rb -v <path_to_hadashboard>/hapush:/app/hapush --net=host hadashboard

This will use all of the same configuration files as specified below in the configuration sections, although you will need to make a few changes to the hapush configuration to match the docker’s filesystem, detailed below.

By default, the docker instance should pick up your timezone but if you want to explicitly set it you can add an environment variable for your specific zone as follows:

 -e "TZ=Europe/Amsterdam"
 ```

### Docker on Raspberry Pi

Raspberry pi needs to use a different docker build file so the build command is slightly different:

```bash
$ docker build -f Docker-raspi/Dockerfile -t hadashboard .

Apart from that the other steps are identical.

Note - this is pretty slow even on a PI3, be prepared for it to take an hour or two to build all of the extensions and install everything

Manual Installation

Clone the Repository

Clone the hadashboard repository to the current local directory on your machine.

$ git clone https://github.com/home-assistant/hadashboard.git

Change your working directory to the repository root. Moving forward, we will be working from this directory.

$ cd hadashboard

2. Install Dashing and prereqs

Essentially, you want to make sure that you have Ruby installed on your local machine. Then, install the Dashing gem:

$ gem install dashing

From your repository root, make sure that all dependencies are available.

Note: on some systems you may also need to install bundler:

$ gem install bundler

When installed run it:

$ bundle

Bundle will now install all the ruby prereqs for running dashing.

Note: Prereqs will vary across different machines. So far users have reported requirements for some additional installs to allow the bundle to complete succesfully:

  • ruby-dev - sudo apt-get install ruby-dev
  • node-js - sudo apt-get install nodejs
  • execjs gem - gem install execjs

You will need to research what works on your particular architecture and also bear in mind that version numbers may change over time.

Note: This is currently running on various versions of Ruby and there are no strong dependencies however your mileage may vary.

Next, in the ./lib directory, copy the ha_conf.rb.example file to ha_conf.rb and edit its settings to reflect your installation, pointing to the machine Home Assistant is running on and adding your api_key.

$ha_url = "http://192.168.1.10:8123"
$ha_apikey = "your key"
  • $ha_url is a reference to your home assistant installation and must include the correct port number and scheme (http:// or https:// as appropriate)
  • $ha_apikey should be set to your key if you have one, otherwise it can remain blank.

The file also contains example newsfeeds for the News widget:

$news_feeds = {
  "Traffic" => "http://api.sr.se/api/rss/traffic/2863",
  "News" => "http://feeds.bbci.co.uk/news/rss.xml",
}

You can leave these alone for now or if you prefer customize them as described in the News widget section below.

When you are done, you can start a local webserver like this:

$ dashing start

Point your browser to http://localhost:3030 to access the hadashboard on your local machine.and you should see the supplied default dashboard.